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How Emilija Milušauskaitė Makes the Emotional Rollercoaster of Creativity Work For Her

By Ellen Clipson - 5 min read

In this interview professional photographer Emilija Milušauskaitė shares her personal and professional insights on the significance of learning your own creative process, and how this can improve your photography one shoot at a time.

Inspired by a creative upbringing, professional photographer Emilija Milušauskaitė has used her experience in photography to refine her skills and learn for herself the importance of creativity.

Her unique visual style pays credit to her commitment to learning new things and facing new creative challenges. We spoke to her about how she characterises her own professional journey as a photographer and the importance of a unique visual language.

How Emotions Can Make Your Photography Better

one person, headshot, young adult, indoors, lifestyles

What got you started in photography?

I think the fact that my mother was a painter contributed a lot to my involvement in visuals. I drew most of my time as a child, ano loved going through old family photographs and slides.

Later I became trusted to take the pictures whilst being with friends. It was only after I bought myself a professional camera that I started considering photography as a potential career option.

portrait, headshot, one person, smiling, happiness
one person, indoors, full length, arts culture and entertainment, men

“it has always been people that interested me the most”

rear view, one person, indoors, real people, adult
one person, auto post production filter, transfer print, indoors, young adult

How has your work or artistic approach changed most during your time as a photographer?

I think my subject matter has changed a lot throughout my time photographing. Although it has always been people that interested me the most, but my focus continues to change. Choosing analogue versus digital a few years back has also turned my creative process upside down.

“emotions fuel life in so many ways and that is the essence of what interests me about people.”

real people, full length, one person, plant, lifestyles

Can you tell us about a shoot or particular image that you learnt the most?

You really do learn something every time you’re on set, as you work with different people, deal with different conditions and try to achieve a certain outcome.

I think being quite an introvert the biggest challenge to me always has been directing people and making them feel at ease. Everyone is so different in front of the camera. I am so much more confident with it now and I’m still learning every single time.

headshot, portrait, one person, young adult, indoors
one person, front view, real people, indoors, waist up
text, western script, communication, one person, men

You have described your work as an honest expression of frustration - what frustration do you aim to put across/visualize?

I think if anything, this is a reflection of what’s going on inside of me. Frustration with things both inside and outside of me is almost a daily occurrence, and not necessarily a bad one, of course. I guess emotions fuel life in so many ways and that is the essence of what interests me about people.

one person, portrait, young adult, auto post production filter, women
headshot, real people, men, portrait, focus on foreground

What do you love most about creativity?

It’s an emotional rollercoaster with so many stages from stress and doubts to the joy of working on it and seeing the outcome. Creativity is such an ever evolving and rewarding thing if you allow it to develop by putting work into it.

men, real people, adult, lifestyles, people

“With internet by our side many things become possible.”

one person, young adult, real people, women, casual clothing

How does your home country influence your visual language if at all?

I have never actually thought about that. I don’t think Lithuania as a country specifically influences my visual language, but there is definitely a certain nostalgia I feel because I have left home quite early, and that probably reflects in the things I do.

hat, one person, real people, clothing, day

What does balanced representation mean to you?

In my own practice I found that many things happen due to recommendations and knowing certain people, which can be frustrating depending on where and how new one is to the creative industry. But that’s just how things are and one should really never take things personally.

As cliche as it sounds, putting your head to it and doing the thing you love will make you progress inevitably. With internet by our side many things become possible.

portrait, one person, hat, looking at camera, men
front view, one person, fashion, real people, transfer print

Discover Emilija’s EyeEm Profile for more thought-provoking portraits. Or keep up to date with her Instagram Profile

Feeling inspired? Submit your photography to the first official International Women’s Day Photo Competition! Share your portrait images that empower women and celebrate diversity.