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Human right

“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
“Being a Rohingya” photography project. The Rohingya community has been depicted as “among the world’s least wanted” and “one of the world’s most persecuted minorities.” Archbishop Desmond Tutu has called the violence against Rohingya a “slow genocide.” Despite deep concerns expressed recently by The Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama, the U.S. State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the recent country transition towards a more democratic government, the situation will not improve anytime soon. The Rohingya people have been my main motivation for a trip to Myanmar last April 2016. These pictures are rare. Few photographers accessed this area classified Red Zone. The Rakhine state has few visitors and limited touristic infrastructure. Check points installed around this community remind that the conflict is recent and the fear of new riots still subsists. During my trip I entered without official approval 3 Rohingya villages around Sittwe and Mrauk U. It enabled me to approach and engage with this hidden population ruled by terror. The purpose of these pictures is to increase the awareness and illustrate the humanitarian crisis of a country waiting for Rohingyas to disappear. Black & White Black And White Blackandwhite Burma Children Documentary Fear Genocide Human Condition Human Right Human Rights Minority Muslim Myanmar Oppression Photojournalism Population Poverty Red Zone  Rohingya Stateless Terror The Photojournalist - 2016 EyeEm Awards Unauthorized Village Life
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