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Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,