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Tall ships, sailing vessels, ships, vessels, wind power, renezvous, skyline, bay, harbor city, clouds, parade, nautical, naval, navy, military, San Diego, California,

The Tall Ship leading the parade is Californian which was built in 1984 as a replica of the United States Revenue Marine cutter C.W. Lawrence, which operated off the coast of California in the 1850s. On July 23, 2003, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Bill No. 965, making her the "official state tall ship" of California. Originally commissioned by the Nautical Heritage Society, she has flown the flag of California up and down the coast and in ports ranging from Hawaii, Mexico, and the East Coast. She also represented the state at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. The model for her figurehead was actress Catherine Bach, who was chosen as she was descended from one of the state's early families. Californian, Sails, Bay, Harbor, Masts, Parade, San Diego, California, Day Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Water
The Tall Ship leading the parade is Californian which was built in 1984 as a replica of the United States Revenue Marine cutter C.W. Lawrence, which operated off the coast of California in the 1850s. On July 23, 2003, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Bill No. 965, making her the "official state tall ship" of California. Originally commissioned by the Nautical Heritage Society, she has flown the flag of California up and down the coast and in ports ranging from Hawaii, Mexico, and the East Coast. She also represented the state at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. The model for her figurehead was actress Catherine Bach, who was chosen as she was descended from one of the state's early families. Californian, Sails, Bay, Harbor, Masts, Parade, San Diego, California, Day Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Water
Spectators experienced naval warfare as ships engaged in re-enactments on the bay. Guests onboard the ships could join the crews on deck toeing the lines as they battled opposing ships. Did you know that Cannons are known as land-based weapons and that weapons used on ships are called guns? The guns used during the cannon battles were replicas of guns used during the 17th and 18th centuries. With the proper charge used, these guns could fire a projectile upward of 1,500 feet or more. Naturally, they did not fire projectiles of any kind; black powder was formed in aluminum foil and touched off to create a blank charge. The smoke from the cannon fire can be seen in some of the following photographs. Architecture Building Exterior Canon, Artillery, Smoke, San Diego, California, Cloud - Sky Day Mode Of Transport Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sailing Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Transportation Water Waterfront
Next in line in the Parade of Tall Ships is Curlew. Curlew is a fore and aft schooner. Like many tall ships her age, Curlew has many sea stories to tell. A 1926 John Alden Designed Schooner she was originally built for Charles Andrews of the New York Yacht Club, Curlew competed in the NYYC’s ocean cruising class racing from Newport to Bermuda. She was then donated to the Merchant Marine Academy in 1940 to serve as a sail training vessel and conducted submarine patrol duty for the Coast Guard during WWII. She continued to serve as a training vessel for the Coast Guard in New Haven, Connecticut and Cape May, New Jersey. Her career in the charter service started with her delivery crew having to abandon her in a storm that was reported to be the largest low pressure in the area for 40 years, which took the lives of 144 people in 1962. After many owners and extensive rebuilds she cruised in the Central and South Pacific, and the West Coast. Day Mast Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sailing Schooner, Curlew, Cargo Ship, Bay, Harbor, San Diego, California, Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Transportation Water
The Tall Ships have left their anchorages and moorings and begin to tack out of the Harbor to rendezvous for the start of the Parade of Sail. Note the U.S. Navy Destroyer escorting the Tall Ships. Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California,
Next in line in the Parade of Tall Ships is Curlew. Curlew is a fore and aft schooner. Like many tall ships her age, Curlew has many sea stories to tell. A 1926 John Alden Designed Schooner she was originally built for Charles Andrews of the New York Yacht Club, Curlew competed in the NYYC’s ocean cruising class racing from Newport to Bermuda. She was then donated to the Merchant Marine Academy in 1940 to serve as a sail training vessel and conducted submarine patrol duty for the Coast Guard during WWII. She continued to serve as a training vessel for the Coast Guard in New Haven, Connecticut and Cape May, New Jersey. Her career in the charter service started with her delivery crew having to abandon her in a storm that was reported to be the largest low pressure in the area for 40 years, which took the lives of 144 people in 1962. After many owners and extensive rebuilds she cruised in the Central and South Pacific, and the West Coast. Day Mast Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sailing Schooner, Curlew, Cargo Ship, Bay, Harbor, San Diego, California, Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Transportation Water
Spirit of Dana Point is a traditionally built replica of a 1770s privateer schooner used during the American Revolution. These ships were known for their speed and were used for smuggling. The ship is 118 feet long with a rig height of 100 feet… and 5,000 square feet of sail! Formerly the Pilgrim of Newport, the re-named Spirit of Dana Point is an excellent teaching platform where students directly experience life at sea as it has been for hundreds of years. The 118-ft. schooner is used for living history and at-sea maritime programs throughout the year. San Diego, California, Bay, Harbor, Bridge, Flag, Hotel, Ballpark, Convention Center, Library, Skyline, Pier, Waterfront, Cloud - Sky Day Mast Mode Of Transport Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sailing Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Transportation Water
This is Patricia Belle. Schooner Patricia Belle was built by owner Captain Patrick Hughes from 1994 – 1998. Constructed of locally grown Douglas Fir in Port Orchard, Washington. Her shake down cruise was from Seattle to Nicaragua, returning with 10,000 pounds of Arabic coffee to San Diego. Patricia Belle has sailed the Pacific to Hawaii, Mexican Waters annually for 10 years, Central America, Panama, through the Golf Coast of America, Bahamas, Caribbean and South America. As a private family owned schooner, friends, family and Mariners in training are always welcome aboard. Architecture Boat Cloud - Sky Day Mast Mode Of Transport Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sailboat Sailing Sailing Ship Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Transportation Water Waterfront
Here we have Cloudia. The Cloudia is a rare example of a classic Norwegian double ended ketch with four signature red sails. Originally christened in 1934, the Cloudia is a beautifully restored, rare example of a classic Norwegian double ended ketch. Inspired by the original designs of famed naval architect Colin Archer (1832-1921), from Larvik, Norway, the Cloudia is a Listerskøyte. The top-sail ketch is notable for durability and safety. Archer’s shipyard designed and constructed the famed Fram, which participated in a number of expeditions to the North Pole and later supported Roald Amundsen’s historic first expedition to the South Pole. San Diego, California, Bridges, Day Mast Mode Of Transport Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sailboat Sailing Sailing Ship Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Transportation Water
The Tall Ships have left their anchorages and moorings and begin to tack out of the Harbor to rendezvous for the start of the Parade of Sail. Note the U.S. Navy Destroyer escorting the Tall Ships. Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California,
Spirit of Dana Point is a traditionally built replica of a 1770s privateer schooner used during the American Revolution. These ships were known for their speed and were used for smuggling. The ship is 118 feet long with a rig height of 100 feet… and 5,000 square feet of sail! Formerly the Pilgrim of Newport, the re-named Spirit of Dana Point is an excellent teaching platform where students directly experience life at sea as it has been for hundreds of years. The 118-ft. schooner is used for living history and at-sea maritime programs throughout the year. San Diego, California, Bay, Harbor, Bridge, Flag, Hotel, Ballpark, Convention Center, Library, Skyline, Pier, Waterfront, Cloud - Sky Day Mast Mode Of Transport Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sailing Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Transportation Water
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
Here we have Cloudia. The Cloudia is a rare example of a classic Norwegian double ended ketch with four signature red sails. Originally christened in 1934, the Cloudia is a beautifully restored, rare example of a classic Norwegian double ended ketch. Inspired by the original designs of famed naval architect Colin Archer (1832-1921), from Larvik, Norway, the Cloudia is a Listerskøyte. The top-sail ketch is notable for durability and safety. Archer’s shipyard designed and constructed the famed Fram, which participated in a number of expeditions to the North Pole and later supported Roald Amundsen’s historic first expedition to the South Pole. San Diego, California, Bridges, Day Mast Mode Of Transport Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sailboat Sailing Sailing Ship Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Transportation Water
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
The Tall Ships have left their anchorages and moorings and begin to tack out of the Harbor to rendezvous for the start of the Parade of Sail. Note the U.S. Navy Destroyer escorting the Tall Ships. Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California,
Although she did not sail during this year’s Festival of Sail, nevertheless the Star of India remains the pride and joy of San Diego. San Diego’s Star of India is the ‘world’s oldest active sailing ship’. When many were still being created out of wood, this iron ship built in 1863 was a great experiment. Beginning the stages of her life known as Euterpe, this full-rigged ship continued until changes were made almost four decades later. The ship’s sailing began with rough seas. Within two trips to India she endured a cyclone, the death of her first captain, collision and a mutiny. Surviving this difficult beginning, she was turned into a cargo ship and returned to India four more times. In 1871, her ownership turned to London where she began a 25-year run of moving British emigrants to the South Pacific. In that quarter century, she circumnavigated over twenty trips. Her log suggests those trips often found her ‘laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner’, but she was the little iron ship that could. Life for the ship was as difficult as it was for those aboard. Emigrants spent time in cramped quarters, with limited rations and suffering disease and malnutrition. Although some perished during the journey, most saw a successful life in their new home of New Zealand. Later sold to the Pacific Colonial Ship Company of San Francisco, today’s Star of India gained Hawaiian registry and later American registry – which was a true feat for a foreign-built ship. Nearing retirement, she became a salmon hauler regularly making the journey from Alaska to California until coming to a complete rest in 1923. Rescued by James Wood Coffroth in 1926, she was given to the Zoological Society of San Diego with the idea to be made into a floating museum. Taking years to cultivate a following and enough funds necessary, her restoration continues as she spends more and more time in the water she adores. Today, the Star of India shares her story with hundreds daily. She stands as the centerpiece to San Diego’s Maritime Museum and proudly flies her restful sails in the southern California sunshine. This concludes our Series on Tall Ships in San Diego. Where to next? Star Of India, San Diego, California, Day Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Tall Ships, Sails, Sailing, Masts, Rigging, Museum, Maritine, Navigation, Nautical,
The Tall Ship leading the parade is Californian which was built in 1984 as a replica of the United States Revenue Marine cutter C.W. Lawrence, which operated off the coast of California in the 1850s. On July 23, 2003, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Bill No. 965, making her the "official state tall ship" of California. Originally commissioned by the Nautical Heritage Society, she has flown the flag of California up and down the coast and in ports ranging from Hawaii, Mexico, and the East Coast. She also represented the state at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. The model for her figurehead was actress Catherine Bach, who was chosen as she was descended from one of the state's early families. Californian, Sails, Bay, Harbor, Masts, Parade, San Diego, California, Day Nature Nautical Vessel No People Outdoors Sea Sky Tall Ships, Sailing Vessels, Ships, Vessels, Wind Power, Renezvous, Skyline, Bay, Harbor City, Clouds, Parade, Nautical, Naval, Navy, Military, San Diego, California, Water
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