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San Diego-Coronado Bay Bridge, arches, pillars, stanchions, pilings, girders, steel curved, traffic, sailboats, underneath, San Diego, California,

The principal architect was Robert Mosher. Construction on the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge started in February 1967. The bridge required 20,000 tons of steel (13,000 tons in structural steel and 7,000 in reinforcing steel) and 94,000 cubic yards of concrete. To add the concrete girders, 900,000 cubic yards of fill was dredged and the caissons for the towers were drilled and blasted 100 feet into the bed of the bay. The bridge opened to traffic on August 3, 1969, during the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the founding of San Diego. The 11,179-foot-long (3,407m or 2.1 mi) bridge ascends from Coronado at a 4.67 percent grade before curving 80 degrees toward San Diego. It is supported by 27 concrete girders, the longest ever made at the time of construction. The 30 mission-arch shaped concrete towers, designed to reflect regional historical architecture, rest on 487 prestressed reinforced concrete piles, 54 inches in diameter. Under the roadway is a steel-mesh catwalk built to facilitate bridge maintenance. Caltrans conducts routine inspections to detect concrete flaking and exposed bare metal surfaces. Painting the bridge is a never-ending job. A four-person crew works year-round to keep it protected from corrosive ocean breezes. The blue color was chosen to blend with sky and sea. Most locals refer to it as The Big Blue Bridge. In 1976 the bridge was retrofitted with special rods to protect against earthquake damage. Architecture Bridges, Highway, Freeway, Structure, Arches, Concrete, Access, Pedestrian, Vehicle, Cabrillo Bridge, Balboa Park, San Diego, California, Trees, Landscape, Tower, Railings, Scenic, Seismic, Day No People Outdoors San Diego-Coronado Bay Bridge, Arches, Pillars, Stanchions, Pilings, Girders, Steel Curved, Traffic, Sailboats, Underneath, San Diego, California,
The principal architect was Robert Mosher. Construction on the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge started in February 1967. The bridge required 20,000 tons of steel (13,000 tons in structural steel and 7,000 in reinforcing steel) and 94,000 cubic yards of concrete. To add the concrete girders, 900,000 cubic yards of fill was dredged and the caissons for the towers were drilled and blasted 100 feet into the bed of the bay. The bridge opened to traffic on August 3, 1969, during the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the founding of San Diego. The 11,179-foot-long (3,407m or 2.1 mi) bridge ascends from Coronado at a 4.67 percent grade before curving 80 degrees toward San Diego. It is supported by 27 concrete girders, the longest ever made at the time of construction. The 30 mission-arch shaped concrete towers, designed to reflect regional historical architecture, rest on 487 prestressed reinforced concrete piles, 54 inches in diameter. Under the roadway is a steel-mesh catwalk built to facilitate bridge maintenance. Caltrans conducts routine inspections to detect concrete flaking and exposed bare metal surfaces. Painting the bridge is a never-ending job. A four-person crew works year-round to keep it protected from corrosive ocean breezes. The blue color was chosen to blend with sky and sea. Most locals refer to it as The Big Blue Bridge. In 1976 the bridge was retrofitted with special rods to protect against earthquake damage. Architecture Bridges, Highway, Freeway, Structure, Arches, Concrete, Access, Pedestrian, Vehicle, Cabrillo Bridge, Balboa Park, San Diego, California, Trees, Landscape, Tower, Railings, Scenic, Seismic, Day No People Outdoors San Diego-Coronado Bay Bridge, Arches, Pillars, Stanchions, Pilings, Girders, Steel Curved, Traffic, Sailboats, Underneath, San Diego, California,
The principal architect was Robert Mosher. Construction on the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge started in February 1967. The bridge required 20,000 tons of steel (13,000 tons in structural steel and 7,000 in reinforcing steel) and 94,000 cubic yards of concrete. To add the concrete girders, 900,000 cubic yards of fill was dredged and the caissons for the towers were drilled and blasted 100 feet into the bed of the bay. The bridge opened to traffic on August 3, 1969, during the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the founding of San Diego. The 11,179-foot-long (3,407m or 2.1 mi) bridge ascends from Coronado at a 4.67 percent grade before curving 80 degrees toward San Diego. It is supported by 27 concrete girders, the longest ever made at the time of construction. The 30 mission-arch shaped concrete towers, designed to reflect regional historical architecture, rest on 487 prestressed reinforced concrete piles, 54 inches in diameter. Under the roadway is a steel-mesh catwalk built to facilitate bridge maintenance. Caltrans conducts routine inspections to detect concrete flaking and exposed bare metal surfaces. Painting the bridge is a never-ending job. A four-person crew works year-round to keep it protected from corrosive ocean breezes. The blue color was chosen to blend with sky and sea. Most locals refer to it as The Big Blue Bridge. In 1976 the bridge was retrofitted with special rods to protect against earthquake damage. Architecture Bridges, Highway, Freeway, Structure, Arches, Concrete, Access, Pedestrian, Vehicle, Cabrillo Bridge, Balboa Park, San Diego, California, Trees, Landscape, Tower, Railings, Scenic, Seismic, Day No People Outdoors San Diego-Coronado Bay Bridge, Arches, Pillars, Stanchions, Pilings, Girders, Steel Curved, Traffic, Sailboats, Underneath, San Diego, California,
The principal architect was Robert Mosher. Construction on the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge started in February 1967. The bridge required 20,000 tons of steel (13,000 tons in structural steel and 7,000 in reinforcing steel) and 94,000 cubic yards of concrete. To add the concrete girders, 900,000 cubic yards of fill was dredged and the caissons for the towers were drilled and blasted 100 feet into the bed of the bay. The bridge opened to traffic on August 3, 1969, during the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the founding of San Diego. The 11,179-foot-long (3,407m or 2.1 mi) bridge ascends from Coronado at a 4.67 percent grade before curving 80 degrees toward San Diego. It is supported by 27 concrete girders, the longest ever made at the time of construction. The 30 mission-arch shaped concrete towers, designed to reflect regional historical architecture, rest on 487 prestressed reinforced concrete piles, 54 inches in diameter. Under the roadway is a steel-mesh catwalk built to facilitate bridge maintenance. Caltrans conducts routine inspections to detect concrete flaking and exposed bare metal surfaces. Painting the bridge is a never-ending job. A four-person crew works year-round to keep it protected from corrosive ocean breezes. The blue color was chosen to blend with sky and sea. Most locals refer to it as The Big Blue Bridge. In 1976 the bridge was retrofitted with special rods to protect against earthquake damage. Architecture Bridges, Highway, Freeway, Structure, Arches, Concrete, Access, Pedestrian, Vehicle, Cabrillo Bridge, Balboa Park, San Diego, California, Trees, Landscape, Tower, Railings, Scenic, Seismic, Day No People Outdoors San Diego-Coronado Bay Bridge, Arches, Pillars, Stanchions, Pilings, Girders, Steel Curved, Traffic, Sailboats, Underneath, San Diego, California,
The principal architect was Robert Mosher. Construction on the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge started in February 1967. The bridge required 20,000 tons of steel (13,000 tons in structural steel and 7,000 in reinforcing steel) and 94,000 cubic yards of concrete. To add the concrete girders, 900,000 cubic yards of fill was dredged and the caissons for the towers were drilled and blasted 100 feet into the bed of the bay. The bridge opened to traffic on August 3, 1969, during the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the founding of San Diego. The 11,179-foot-long (3,407m or 2.1 mi) bridge ascends from Coronado at a 4.67 percent grade before curving 80 degrees toward San Diego. It is supported by 27 concrete girders, the longest ever made at the time of construction. The 30 mission-arch shaped concrete towers, designed to reflect regional historical architecture, rest on 487 prestressed reinforced concrete piles, 54 inches in diameter. Under the roadway is a steel-mesh catwalk built to facilitate bridge maintenance. Caltrans conducts routine inspections to detect concrete flaking and exposed bare metal surfaces. Painting the bridge is a never-ending job. A four-person crew works year-round to keep it protected from corrosive ocean breezes. The blue color was chosen to blend with sky and sea. Most locals refer to it as The Big Blue Bridge. In 1976 the bridge was retrofitted with special rods to protect against earthquake damage. Architecture Bridges, Highway, Freeway, Structure, Arches, Concrete, Access, Pedestrian, Vehicle, Cabrillo Bridge, Balboa Park, San Diego, California, Trees, Landscape, Tower, Railings, Scenic, Seismic, Day No People Outdoors San Diego-Coronado Bay Bridge, Arches, Pillars, Stanchions, Pilings, Girders, Steel Curved, Traffic, Sailboats, Underneath, San Diego, California,