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Ecossytem

(North Beach, North Canyon, Nazare. North Canyon is the deepest underwater canyon in Europe, recently turned famous, particularly in the surfing circuit, due to its massive waves that can reach 100ft) Situated in the Portuguese Silver Coast, Nazare is a small fishing village in Portugal. Long an inspiration for many photographers and cinematographers, including a young Stanley Kubrik, Nazare has a very unique local culture intrinsically connected with the oceans with a long and rich sea tradition, embedded in local folklore. The Woman of Nazare ( Nazarena) for example, is the column that holds the community together and has been immortalised in monuments locally. When the men were at sea for months on end, the Woman of Nazare took care of family, business (usually selling fish and other sea produce) and everything else on land. This is even reflected in traditional attire. The "7 skirts" (Sete Saias) for example, were in fact mostly work or utility aprons and shawls, exquisitely decorated and usually made by hand. When the men were returning from the sea with the catch, usually at night, the women would then be waiting on the beach and the aprons would turn to shawls becoming protective layers that they would wrap themselves with gradually as the cold set it. The sea was both the source of sustenance as well as of a lot of sorrow. Many women had lost husbands, sons and brothers at sea and many would trade in the colourful attire for black in mourning, a trait that it is still observed today. Some women continued their mourning to the end of their lives. Over the years, the fishing industry started to decline as both overfishing and the lack of interest of the younger generations in it, impacted local economy.. Nazare then turned to tourism as the main source of business, particularly in the Summer, season in which it is common for the locals to rent property to tourists over the summer (although nowadays, tourism is all year round, as Nazare became one of the best surfing destinations in the world, brought to world attention by surfer Garrett McNamara for it’s 100ft waves at North Canyon, the deepest underwater canyon in Europe). While fishing is still part of the local economy, over the years the impact of overfishing in particular, has made it secondary to other local industries. Currently, sardines for example, a staple of not only the local diet but also the national diet, have been interdicted and are hard to find in the market. There has been a ban imposed in the fishing of the species, although local fishermen debate this and the quotas imposed by the EU. Other aspects of the local culture that have been affected by the decline of the fishing industry and the lack of interest of the younger generations, are certain local traditions and art forms. “Arte Xavega” is both a method of artisan fishing and the art of making, mending nets, involving as well a particular type of boat “barco do candil” a flat bottomed, long tipped boat. Some of these activities and cultural artifacts can still be seen at the beach, with the net making and mending being made and often sold as small souvenirs to tourists. Nowadays, many of the local traditions are relegated to tourism shows and celebrated in local festivities, but despite the decline, Nazare still has a strong cultural identity in the country and locals can still be seen wearing local traditional attire and engaging in traditional games or activities. Beach Ecossytem Ecosystem  Fishing Nazaré  People Of The Oceans Portugal Portugaldenorteasul SIlver Coast Tourism
(A trawler boat enters the Port) Situated in the Portuguese Silver Coast, Nazare is a small fishing village in Portugal. Long an inspiration for many photographers and cinematographers, including a young Stanley Kubrik, Nazare has a very unique local culture intrinsically connected with the oceans with a long and rich sea tradition, embedded in local folklore. The Woman of Nazare ( Nazarena) for example, is the column that holds the community together and has been immortalised in monuments locally. When the men were at sea for months on end, the Woman of Nazare took care of family, business (usually selling fish and other sea produce) and everything else on land. This is even reflected in traditional attire. The "7 skirts" (Sete Saias) for example, were in fact mostly work or utility aprons and shawls, exquisitely decorated and usually made by hand. When the men were returning from the sea with the catch, usually at night, the women would then be waiting on the beach and the aprons would turn to shawls becoming protective layers that they would wrap themselves with gradually as the cold set it. The sea was both the source of sustenance as well as of a lot of sorrow. Many women had lost husbands, sons and brothers at sea and many would trade in the colourful attire for black in mourning, a trait that it is still observed today. Some women continued their mourning to the end of their lives. Over the years, the fishing industry started to decline as both overfishing and the lack of interest of the younger generations in it, impacted local economy.. Nazare then turned to tourism as the main source of business, particularly in the Summer, season in which it is common for the locals to rent property to tourists over the summer (although nowadays, tourism is all year round, as Nazare became one of the best surfing destinations in the world, brought to world attention by surfer Garrett McNamara for it’s 100ft waves at North Canyon, the deepest underwater canyon in Europe). While fishing is still part of the local economy, over the years the impact of overfishing in particular, has made it secondary to other local industries. Currently, sardines for example, a staple of not only the local diet but also the national diet, have been interdicted and are hard to find in the market. There has been a ban imposed in the fishing of the species, although local fishermen debate this and the quotas imposed by the EU. Other aspects of the local culture that have been affected by the decline of the fishing industry and the lack of interest of the younger generations, are certain local traditions and art forms. “Arte Xavega” is both a method of artisan fishing and the art of making, mending nets, involving as well a particular type of boat “barco do candil” a flat bottomed, long tipped boat. Some of these activities and cultural artifacts can still be seen at the beach, with the net making and mending being made and often sold as small souvenirs to tourists. Nowadays, many of the local traditions are relegated to tourism shows and celebrated in local festivities, but despite the decline, Nazare still has a strong cultural identity in the country and locals can still be seen wearing local traditional attire and engaging in traditional games or activities. Beach Ecossytem Ecosystem  Fishing Nazaré  People Of The Oceans Portugal Portugaldenorteasul SIlver Coast Tourism
(The wall art reads in local parlance: "There are no longer sea wolves being made just children of the beach.", alluding to the decline of the local tradition of fishing) Situated in the Portuguese Silver Coast, Nazare is a small fishing village in Portugal. Long an inspiration for many photographers and cinematographers, including a young Stanley Kubrik, Nazare has a very unique local culture intrinsically connected with the oceans with a long and rich sea tradition, embedded in local folklore. The Woman of Nazare ( Nazarena) for example, is the column that holds the community together and has been immortalised in monuments locally. When the men were at sea for months on end, the Woman of Nazare took care of family, business (usually selling fish and other sea produce) and everything else on land. This is even reflected in traditional attire. The "7 skirts" (Sete Saias) for example, were in fact mostly work or utility aprons and shawls, exquisitely decorated and usually made by hand. When the men were returning from the sea with the catch, usually at night, the women would then be waiting on the beach and the aprons would turn to shawls becoming protective layers that they would wrap themselves with gradually as the cold set it. The sea was both the source of sustenance as well as of a lot of sorrow. Many women had lost husbands, sons and brothers at sea and many would trade in the colourful attire for black in mourning, a trait that it is still observed today. Some women continued their mourning to the end of their lives. Over the years, the fishing industry started to decline as both overfishing and the lack of interest of the younger generations in it, impacted local economy.. Nazare then turned to tourism as the main source of business, particularly in the Summer, season in which it is common for the locals to rent property to tourists over the summer (although nowadays, tourism is all year round, as Nazare became one of the best surfing destinations in the world, brought to world attention by surfer Garrett McNamara for it’s 100ft waves at North Canyon, the deepest underwater canyon in Europe). While fishing is still part of the local economy, over the years the impact of overfishing in particular, has made it secondary to other local industries. Currently, sardines for example, a staple of not only the local diet but also the national diet, have been interdicted and are hard to find in the market. There has been a ban imposed in the fishing of the species, although local fishermen debate this and the quotas imposed by the EU. Other aspects of the local culture that have been affected by the decline of the fishing industry and the lack of interest of the younger generations, are certain local traditions and art forms. “Arte Xavega” is both a method of artisan fishing and the art of making, mending nets, involving as well a particular type of boat “barco do candil” a flat bottomed, long tipped boat. Some of these activities and cultural artifacts can still be seen at the beach, with the net making and mending being made and often sold as small souvenirs to tourists. Nowadays, many of the local traditions are relegated to tourism shows and celebrated in local festivities, but despite the decline, Nazare still has a strong cultural identity in the country and locals can still be seen wearing local traditional attire and engaging in traditional games or activities. Beach Ecossytem Ecosystem  Fishing Nazaré  People Of The Oceans Portugal Portugaldenorteasul SIlver Coast Tourism
(Tourism has become the primary industry of the local economy. Nazare is a popular destination for both national and international tourists) Situated in the Portuguese Silver Coast, Nazare is a small fishing village in Portugal. Long an inspiration for many photographers and cinematographers, including a young Stanley Kubrik, Nazare has a very unique local culture intrinsically connected with the oceans with a long and rich sea tradition, embedded in local folklore. The Woman of Nazare ( Nazarena) for example, is the column that holds the community together and has been immortalised in monuments locally. When the men were at sea for months on end, the Woman of Nazare took care of family, business (usually selling fish and other sea produce) and everything else on land. This is even reflected in traditional attire. The "7 skirts" (Sete Saias) for example, were in fact mostly work or utility aprons and shawls, exquisitely decorated and usually made by hand. When the men were returning from the sea with the catch, usually at night, the women would then be waiting on the beach and the aprons would turn to shawls becoming protective layers that they would wrap themselves with gradually as the cold set it. The sea was both the source of sustenance as well as of a lot of sorrow. Many women had lost husbands, sons and brothers at sea and many would trade in the colourful attire for black in mourning, a trait that it is still observed today. Some women continued their mourning to the end of their lives. Over the years, the fishing industry started to decline as both overfishing and the lack of interest of the younger generations in it, impacted local economy.. Nazare then turned to tourism as the main source of business, particularly in the Summer, season in which it is common for the locals to rent property to tourists over the summer (although nowadays, tourism is all year round, as Nazare became one of the best surfing destinations in the world, brought to world attention by surfer Garrett McNamara for it’s 100ft waves at North Canyon, the deepest underwater canyon in Europe). While fishing is still part of the local economy, over the years the impact of overfishing in particular, has made it secondary to other local industries. Currently, sardines for example, a staple of not only the local diet but also the national diet, have been interdicted and are hard to find in the market. There has been a ban imposed in the fishing of the species, although local fishermen debate this and the quotas imposed by the EU. Other aspects of the local culture that have been affected by the decline of the fishing industry and the lack of interest of the younger generations, are certain local traditions and art forms. “Arte Xavega” is both a method of artisan fishing and the art of making, mending nets, involving as well a particular type of boat “barco do candil” a flat bottomed, long tipped boat. Some of these activities and cultural artifacts can still be seen at the beach, with the net making and mending being made and often sold as small souvenirs to tourists. Nowadays, many of the local traditions are relegated to tourism shows and celebrated in local festivities, but despite the decline, Nazare still has a strong cultural identity in the country and locals can still be seen wearing local traditional attire and engaging in traditional games or activities. Beach Ecossytem Ecosystem  Fishing Nazaré  People Of The Oceans Portugal Portugaldenorteasul SIlver Coast Street Photography Tourism
(a windmill fashioned out of drift wood and seagull feathers, left behind by visitors to North Beach) Situated in the Portuguese Silver Coast, Nazare is a small fishing village in Portugal. Long an inspiration for many photographers and cinematographers, including a young Stanley Kubrik, Nazare has a very unique local culture intrinsically connected with the oceans with a long and rich sea tradition, embedded in local folklore. The Woman of Nazare ( Nazarena) for example, is the column that holds the community together and has been immortalised in monuments locally. When the men were at sea for months on end, the Woman of Nazare took care of family, business (usually selling fish and other sea produce) and everything else on land. This is even reflected in traditional attire. The "7 skirts" (Sete Saias) for example, were in fact mostly work or utility aprons and shawls, exquisitely decorated and usually made by hand. When the men were returning from the sea with the catch, usually at night, the women would then be waiting on the beach and the aprons would turn to shawls becoming protective layers that they would wrap themselves with gradually as the cold set it. The sea was both the source of sustenance as well as of a lot of sorrow. Many women had lost husbands, sons and brothers at sea and many would trade in the colourful attire for black in mourning, a trait that it is still observed today. Some women continued their mourning to the end of their lives. Over the years, the fishing industry started to decline as both overfishing and the lack of interest of the younger generations in it, impacted local economy.. Nazare then turned to tourism as the main source of business, particularly in the Summer, season in which it is common for the locals to rent property to tourists over the summer (although nowadays, tourism is all year round, as Nazare became one of the best surfing destinations in the world, brought to world attention by surfer Garrett McNamara for it’s 100ft waves at North Canyon, the deepest underwater canyon in Europe). While fishing is still part of the local economy, over the years the impact of overfishing in particular, has made it secondary to other local industries. Currently, sardines for example, a staple of not only the local diet but also the national diet, have been interdicted and are hard to find in the market. There has been a ban imposed in the fishing of the species, although local fishermen debate this and the quotas imposed by the EU. Other aspects of the local culture that have been affected by the decline of the fishing industry and the lack of interest of the younger generations, are certain local traditions and art forms. “Arte Xavega” is both a method of artisan fishing and the art of making, mending nets, involving as well a particular type of boat “barco do candil” a flat bottomed, long tipped boat. Some of these activities and cultural artifacts can still be seen at the beach, with the net making and mending being made and often sold as small souvenirs to tourists. Nowadays, many of the local traditions are relegated to tourism shows and celebrated in local festivities, but despite the decline, Nazare still has a strong cultural identity in the country and locals can still be seen wearing local traditional attire and engaging in traditional games or activities. Beach Ecossytem Ecosystem  Fishing Nazaré  People Of The Oceans Portugal Portugaldenorteasul SIlver Coast Tourism
(local lifeguards) Situated in the Portuguese Silver Coast, Nazare is a small fishing village in Portugal. Long an inspiration for many photographers and cinematographers, including a young Stanley Kubrik, Nazare has a very unique local culture intrinsically connected with the oceans with a long and rich sea tradition, embedded in local folklore. The Woman of Nazare ( Nazarena) for example, is the column that holds the community together and has been immortalised in monuments locally. When the men were at sea for months on end, the Woman of Nazare took care of family, business (usually selling fish and other sea produce) and everything else on land. This is even reflected in traditional attire. The "7 skirts" (Sete Saias) for example, were in fact mostly work or utility aprons and shawls, exquisitely decorated and usually made by hand. When the men were returning from the sea with the catch, usually at night, the women would then be waiting on the beach and the aprons would turn to shawls becoming protective layers that they would wrap themselves with gradually as the cold set it. The sea was both the source of sustenance as well as of a lot of sorrow. Many women had lost husbands, sons and brothers at sea and many would trade in the colourful attire for black in mourning, a trait that it is still observed today. Some women continued their mourning to the end of their lives. Over the years, the fishing industry started to decline as both overfishing and the lack of interest of the younger generations in it, impacted local economy.. Nazare then turned to tourism as the main source of business, particularly in the Summer, season in which it is common for the locals to rent property to tourists over the summer (although nowadays, tourism is all year round, as Nazare became one of the best surfing destinations in the world, brought to world attention by surfer Garrett McNamara for it’s 100ft waves at North Canyon, the deepest underwater canyon in Europe). While fishing is still part of the local economy, over the years the impact of overfishing in particular, has made it secondary to other local industries. Currently, sardines for example, a staple of not only the local diet but also the national diet, have been interdicted and are hard to find in the market. There has been a ban imposed in the fishing of the species, although local fishermen debate this and the quotas imposed by the EU. Other aspects of the local culture that have been affected by the decline of the fishing industry and the lack of interest of the younger generations, are certain local traditions and art forms. “Arte Xavega” is both a method of artisan fishing and the art of making, mending nets, involving as well a particular type of boat “barco do candil” a flat bottomed, long tipped boat. Some of these activities and cultural artifacts can still be seen at the beach, with the net making and mending being made and often sold as small souvenirs to tourists. Nowadays, many of the local traditions are relegated to tourism shows and celebrated in local festivities, but despite the decline, Nazare still has a strong cultural identity in the country and locals can still be seen wearing local traditional attire and engaging in traditional games or activities. Beach Ecossytem Ecosystem  Fishing Nazaré  People Of The Oceans Portugal Portugaldenorteasul SIlver Coast Tourism
(A local woman selling the day's catch in the local fish market) Situated in the Portuguese Silver Coast, Nazare is a small fishing village in Portugal. Long an inspiration for many photographers and cinematographers, including a young Stanley Kubrik, Nazare has a very unique local culture intrinsically connected with the oceans with a long and rich sea tradition, embedded in local folklore. The Woman of Nazare ( Nazarena) for example, is the column that holds the community together and has been immortalised in monuments locally. When the men were at sea for months on end, the Woman of Nazare took care of family, business (usually selling fish and other sea produce) and everything else on land. This is even reflected in traditional attire. The "7 skirts" (Sete Saias) for example, were in fact mostly work or utility aprons and shawls, exquisitely decorated and usually made by hand. When the men were returning from the sea with the catch, usually at night, the women would then be waiting on the beach and the aprons would turn to shawls becoming protective layers that they would wrap themselves with gradually as the cold set it. The sea was both the source of sustenance as well as of a lot of sorrow. Many women had lost husbands, sons and brothers at sea and many would trade in the colourful attire for black in mourning, a trait that it is still observed today. Some women continued their mourning to the end of their lives. Over the years, the fishing industry started to decline as both overfishing and the lack of interest of the younger generations in it, impacted local economy.. Nazare then turned to tourism as the main source of business, particularly in the Summer, season in which it is common for the locals to rent property to tourists over the summer (although nowadays, tourism is all year round, as Nazare became one of the best surfing destinations in the world, brought to world attention by surfer Garrett McNamara for it’s 100ft waves at North Canyon, the deepest underwater canyon in Europe). While fishing is still part of the local economy, over the years the impact of overfishing in particular, has made it secondary to other local industries. Currently, sardines for example, a staple of not only the local diet but also the national diet, have been interdicted and are hard to find in the market. There has been a ban imposed in the fishing of the species, although local fishermen debate this and the quotas imposed by the EU. Other aspects of the local culture that have been affected by the decline of the fishing industry and the lack of interest of the younger generations, are certain local traditions and art forms. “Arte Xavega” is both a method of artisan fishing and the art of making, mending nets, involving as well a particular type of boat “barco do candil” a flat bottomed, long tipped boat. Some of these activities and cultural artifacts can still be seen at the beach, with the net making and mending being made and often sold as small souvenirs to tourists. Nowadays, many of the local traditions are relegated to tourism shows and celebrated in local festivities, but despite the decline, Nazare still has a strong cultural identity in the country and locals can still be seen wearing local traditional attire and engaging in traditional games or activities. Beach Ecossytem Ecosystem  Fishing Nazaré  People Of The Oceans Portugal Portugaldenorteasul SIlver Coast Tourism